Foods that cause digestive problems.

When your digestive system comes into contact with a substance that the immune system considers a threat, it responds quickly by releasing a chemical called histamine. Histamine, along with other substances in the body, is what causes a reaction. This reaction is not related to age; it can occur suddenly and can cause uncomfortable digestive symptoms. An allergy can cause digestive problems, such as stomach pain, diarrhea, and vomiting in adults and children.

If you think you or someone you love has a food allergy, don’t try to fix the problem without help. You may be eliminating some foods from your diet unnecessarily. Ask your healthcare professional for a blood test to find out what could be the possible causes of your symptoms

We are going to talk about a few foods that could cause poor digestion on the next page.

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EGGS

Eggs can be an excellent source of protein as part of a healthy diet. But you may be allergic to some of the proteins found in egg yolk, egg white, or even both. Egg allergy, like other allergies, occurs when the immune system identifies these proteins as harmful. By ingesting these proteins, the immune system is sensitized and reacts by releasing histamines, which are the cause of allergic symptoms. People with an egg allergy should avoid both the white and the yolk of the egg, as it is not possible to separate the two completely.

Egg allergy can cause some of the following signs and symptoms:

  • Skin rashes / hives
  • Nasal congestion (rare)
  • Mild wheezing or coughing (rare)
  • Digestive symptoms (for example, stomach pain, diarrhea, nausea)
  • Vomiting

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MILK

However, children with high levels of cow’s milk antibodies in their blood are more likely to have a lifelong milk allergy. A simple blood test that measures these antibodies can help a healthcare professional determine if your child has a chance of overcoming his milk allergy.

Between 2 and 3% of children under 3 years of age are allergic to milk. Almost all children who develop a milk allergy do so in their first year of life, but around 80% usually outgrow the disease. However, this research also suggests that children are outgrowing their milk allergy more slowly than before, and that many children continue to be allergic after age 5.

Since most children outgrow their allergy to milk, regular evaluation, including testing, is recommended.


However, children with high levels of cow’s milk antibodies in their blood are more likely to have a lifelong milk allergy. A simple blood test that measures these antibodies can help a healthcare professional determine if your child has a chance of overcoming his milk allergy.

Common signs and symptoms of a milk allergy include:

  • Mild wheezing or coughing
  • Vomiting
  • Skin rashes / hives
  • Digestive symptoms (for example, stomach pain, diarrhea, nausea)
  • Bloody stools (especially in babies)

Babies and children who are allergic to milk are more likely to develop eczema (atopic dermatitis) and other allergies.

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Fish or shellfish allergy

Many people love fish and seafood, from salmon to shrimp to scallops. But, unfortunately, some of these people have the possibility of developing a shellfish and fish allergy. Although both are in the category of “seafood”, fish and shellfish are biologically different, so fish does not cause an allergic reaction in a person with a shellfish allergy or vice versa.

An allergy to fish or shellfish, like any allergy, occurs when the immune system considers that something it has come in contact with is harmful. If you have an allergy and eat fish or shellfish, your immune system releases histamines, which are what cause allergic symptoms.

Fish and shellfish allergies are rare, but serious: they can cause anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction. Many people with a fish or shellfish allergy have developed it as adults (60% of shellfish allergies and 40% of fish allergies begin as adults) and their reactions can be severe.These allergies can be caused by fish or shellfish that you have eaten without problems before, but once an allergy to fish or shellfish develops, it is usually kept for the rest of your life.

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Allergies to fruits and vegetables

Everyone says you should eat fruits and vegetables, but if you have an allergy to these foods, it can do you more harm than good. A fruit and vegetable allergy, like any other allergy, occurs when the immune system considers the proteins in fruits and vegetables to be harmful. When it comes in contact with these proteins, the immune system responds and releases histamines, which are what cause allergic symptoms.

There are many different fruits and vegetables known to cause allergic reactions, from strawberries to onions. Fruits and vegetables can be a hidden ingredient in many foods. Therefore, it is important that you read the label or ask what the ingredients are before buying or eating certain foods. Ingredients in packaged foods may change at any time and without prior notice. Therefore, always try to read the ingredients carefully.

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Peanut allergy

There may be a lot of anxiety and confusion about peanuts and a peanut allergy. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with a peanut allergy, you may be scared. This is partly because peanuts are often associated with anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction. It can also be difficult to come to terms with the loss of spontaneity and confidence that comes with a diagnosis of a peanut allergy.

However, knowing your peanut allergy can help ease your fears.

Peanuts are the leading cause of death associated with food-induced anaphylaxis. Symptoms of anaphylaxis include respiratory disturbance, throat swelling, sudden drop in blood pressure, pale skin or blue lips, dizziness, and fainting.

Less severe symptoms of a peanut allergy are similar to most allergy symptoms and include:

  • Itchy skin or hives
  • Itching or tingling sensation in the mouth or throat
  • Sickness
  • Runny or stuffy nose

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Nut allergy

There are many types of nuts: almonds, cashews and walnuts are very well known.

Nut allergies are a common type of food allergy in both children and adults. Nut allergy, like any allergy, occurs when the immune system identifies that something you have eaten or come into contact with is harmful. When nuts are eaten or even touched, proteins cause the immune system to respond and release histamines, which are what cause allergy symptoms. Nut allergy can cause anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction.

Unfortunately, a nut allergy usually lasts a lifetime – less than 10% of people outgrow it. Some people who have had severe reactions to nuts may overcome their allergy to nuts. Therefore, the severity of the reaction does not necessarily mean that it will not overcome the allergy.

Here are some other symptoms of a nut allergy:

  • Intense itching
  • Digestive symptoms (for example, stomach pain, diarrhea, nausea)
  • Difficulty to swallow
  • Shortness of breath
  • Shortness of breath
  • Vomiting
  • Itching in the mouth, throat, eyes, skin or any other area

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Wheat allergy

If you have a stomach ache after eating cereals, bread, or pasta, you may have a wheat allergy. A wheat allergy, like other allergies, occurs when the immune system identifies wheat proteins as harmful. Therefore, when you eat wheat, your immune system responds and releases histamine and other chemical mediators, causing allergy symptoms.

Wheat allergy is more common in children, but they usually outgrow it before they reach school age. In rare cases, it can cause serious reactions such as anaphylaxis, a life-threatening reaction that can cause shortness of breath and lead to shock.

Consuming wheat in combination with physical exercise can, on rare occasions, cause what some call “runner’s shock” or what is also known as wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis. The combination of wheat consumption and exercise causes a severe reaction and possible anaphylaxis. The reason for the runner’s shock is usually a part of the wheat that is especially allergenic and requires medical attention.

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