Allergic Asthma: Symptoms and Causes

Allergic asthma

Asthma is a chronic lung disease that causes your airways to become inflamed, narrow, and produce more mucus. Understandably, this combination can make it difficult for you to breathe.

Asthma is a serious and widespread disease, affecting approximately 300 million people worldwide. For some of these people, asthma is just a minor annoyance, but for others it can be a major nuisance. impact on your day to day.

Asthma and allergies tend to go hand in hand. Most people with asthma also have allergies. In fact, up to 90% of children and 60% of adults with asthma suffer from allergies. Also, allergies can trigger asthma or make it worse. When allergies trigger or worsen asthma, it is known as “allergic asthma” or “allergy-induced asthma.”

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COMMON SYMPTOMS OF ALLERGIC ASTHMA

Asthma usually has at least one or more of the following symptoms:

Cough (especially at night)
Shortness of breath
Wheezing
Pressure or pain in the chest

To control your asthma, it is important to identify and minimize your exposure to all of your asthma triggers, especially those that trigger your allergy.

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COMMON TRIGGERS OF ALLERGIC ASTHMA

When it comes to managing your asthma, it is important to identify and minimize exposure to allergic triggers that you may have. Many of the same substances that cause an allergic reaction can also affect people with asthma, including:

Pollen

Animal dander

Dust mites

Insects

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Although there is a close connection between allergies and asthma, there are many other triggers that you should be aware of as well. Some of the most common non-allergic triggers are cold or dry air, exercise, exposure to cigarette smoke or strong odors, the flu, and other respiratory infections. Many people with asthma have multiple triggers.

Identifying your triggers as early as possible is the key to improving symptom control. Also, you will need to pay special attention to your allergy and asthma triggers, as they can change over time.

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WHY DON’T I HAVE SYMPTOMS ALL THE TIME?

Everyone has their own unique combination of allergic triggers and not all of them are obvious. In fact, most people with allergies (up to 80%) are allergic to several things. You may experience mild reactions to various allergens, but they are so minor that you won’t notice them on your own. However, if you come into contact with several things that you are allergic to, all those little reactions can add up to the point that you will start to experience asthma symptoms.

Determining if you have allergies and identifying your triggers can help you stay below the point after which you start to develop symptoms of allergic asthma – your threshold for symptoms. Reducing exposure to confirmed allergy triggers has been shown to have a significant impact on your ability to control asthma – fewer symptoms, fewer hospital visits, and better quality of life.

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